2 PANS kids fighting lyme and coinfections, our journey to healing

Now to what we really believe is going on… Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) a spectrum.

Anxious attachment, adoption trauma, anxiety, borderline personality disorder… Sadly From Survival to Serenity no longer encourages the sharing of the graphic but if you want to read further, and I heartily encourage you to, on Saturday, August 23, 2014, From Survival To Serenity published a post titled: Educating About RAD.  If you read my last post you can tell school is an exceptional challenge already this year.  I will be using parts of From Survival to Serenity when I go on Monday and advocate again for my child.  It won’t solve the issues he is having, (thankfully his teachers and principle are determined to help him stay the course), but it will possibly help explain him.  The post has some very practical, well presented information that in turn can help any of us with a RAD child (however mild or extreme) educate the people who are charged with taking care of our little peanuts for the better part of the day.  Forewarned is forearmed as they say! 😀 Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new...

Their uniqueness may very well be their strength in the future …

But we must get them there before that can happen.  The only problem is getting others on board with that philosophy too. Society has an ingrained need and desire to make everyone conform to their own standards, especially true of public schools.  Often the desire to drill down and over focus on the negatives drives many kids to act out more not less. Even if your child has no diagnosis of Tourette Syndrome, I found this very concise rundown of behaviors than can pertain to so many different issues we see with our kids, both diagnosed and un-diagnosed. Understanding Behavioral Symptoms in Tourette Syndrome.  “… Children with TS may be punished for symptoms and behaviors that educators decide are disruptive andpurposeful.  Even an empathetic teacher who recognizes the student as a child who has abilities, may be frustrated because of the difficulties in understanding the cause of the behavior. Dr. Ross Greene, noted psychiatrist and author of The Explosive Child, and Lost at School, writes that, “It is your explanation of the behavior that leads directly to how you respond to it.” If, for example, your explanation for a child rolling his eyes while you are speaking to him is that he is being rude and disrespectful, your response might be to reprimand and discipline him. Alternatively, if you’re thinking that the eye-rolling is a symptom of the child’s neurological disorder, then you’ll be more likely to be compassionate and provide support. Consider a student who is refusing to do work. One educator sees this youngster as being capable but is refusing to complete the task because he doesn’t want to comply.  This educator assumes that the studentchooses not to do the assignment, and therefore uses a punitive approach.  Another teacher sees the student as having the ability, but realizes that the student has learned that it is safer to not even try than to make an attempt and fail. It’s important to recognize that the student’s refusal to do a task is not necessarily because he’s oppositional or lazy. Perhaps knowing the real reason for the behavior – that the student doesn’t like failing – can make the teacher’s response positive and proactive rather than reactive and negative. Educators are more likely to punish a student whom they see as BEING the problem. If the educational team recognizes that the student HAS a problem and is not deliberately causing the problem, they’ll be more likely to provide unique and creative strategies for that student. When educators consider what they can do FOR the child and not what...

I have never seen a kid apologize for being so oppositional WHILE being oppositional!

I feel like I am in the twilight zone most of the time, he cusses like a sailor, is disrespectful, angry and irritated by anyone and everyone for no reason other than he might have seen the back of their heads.  My husband and I are so non confrontational it is probably unhealthy, my children on the other hand keep life exciting by being exactly that! How does one taper the oppositional in a child when every possible strategy backfires? Sometimes all we can do is ignore the rhetoric and let it pass, but then any bystander feels the need to interject.  Such a misunderstood, unrelenting, hard to handle, hard to ignore, stress inducing behavior that every armchair psychologist feels the need to weigh in on. Onwards and upwards, school awaits…. Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new...

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