2 PANS kids fighting lyme and coinfections, our journey to healing

U.S. Rates of Autism, ADHD Continue to Rise:

“MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) — One in six U.S. children now has a developmental disability such as autism, learning disorders or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. …” Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new...

Angst…

There are so many days I don’t post. I don’t post because I have no energy, no reserves left. Writing seems to be a tremendous chore, a chore I do for no one but myself. I am often slack, tired and I opt to nap instead of put down on paper what happened the day, the week, the month before, but some days I feel compelled. Today is a day, this can be cathartic and sometimes I need that more than a nap! Angst noun ˈäŋ(k)st, ˈaŋ(k)st Definition of ANGST : a feeling of anxiety, apprehension, or insecurity <teenage angst> It’s easy to dismiss him during the day, his angst, his anger, his total defiance and rudeness, it’s easy to get angry and retort back mentally or physically. Neither is the solution but none-the-less the release makes ME feel better. What of him? At night, when he should be long sleeping, he is curled up next to me in my bed, too frightened to let me leave, tired but obviously with things on his mind. Every night for the past 7 or 8 months it has been this way. Slowly but surely the days are getting better, but the nights are longer, more emotional and more draining than I ever could have imagined. Night after night, he lays next to me asking questions I don’t have answers too, wishing desperately I did. Invariably in the end, the sobbing begins for both of us. Not sobbing quietly or him gently seeking solace in my arms, this isn’t that at all, this is so much more physical. I could wax poetically in an effort to help someone visualize this letting-out, this pure emotion, but I don’t know that I can. Words don’t adequately paint the picture of how it really is. I remember the noise, that sound, that feeling, very well now. It’s not the gentle sob of when something goes wrong, or when you are frustrated, or even when bad news finds you. It isn’t even the same noise as when someone you love gently reaches the end of his or her life. Its not the same sob I let out the day I heard about my Grandmothers death. Her death of course elicited pain, some guilt, even fear and anger but nothing as guttural as the noise B makes. My angst came from a sadness of knowing that she was gone, tinged with a little guilt because I wasn’t there, guilt not because I couldn’t get there but because I had made a...

Leaders of the free world, #36 in life expectancy.

It has always been interesting to me that whenever vaccine questions arise people assume the data has been studied and vaccinations have been proven safe to inject into their children. We now have more suggested vaccinations over our lifetime than any other county, the closest is Japan and they are not even close.  Are we smarter because of this? Do we have less childhood illness because of this? Do we have lower rates of Alzheimer disease? Parkinson? Autism? Do we have a longer life expectancy now than we did 50 years ago? How do we die, do you know what the leading causes of death in this country actually are? This article ran in the TIMES MAGAZINE in 2007 “Doctors’ sloppy handwriting kills more than 7,000 people annually. It’s a shocking statistic, and, according to a July 2006 report from the National Academies of Science’s Institute of Medicine (IOM), preventable medication mistakes also injure more than 1.5 million Americans annually. Medication errors are a fact of life: “Medication errors are among the most common medical errors, harming at least 1.5 million people every year, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. The extra medical costs of treating drug-related injuries occurring in hospitals alone conservatively amount to $3.5 billion a year, and this estimate does not take into account lost wages and productivity or additional health care costs, the report says…” I worry about this, I worry about our herd mentality. We should be shouting, not wondering, why are we one of the leaders in medicine in the free world but STILL rank at #36 on the life expectancy scale? People are beginning to question the way we are doing things and more people are beginning to realize that the answers we seek may not be found at the bottom of a needle or a pill bottle. We can make some significant changes in these numbers in the positive, but we have to want to do it, we have to start paying attention to what it really means to be healthy. Is it so wrong to question what we are doing to our children with this ‘take a pill and fix it” mentality? More to the point, is it so wrong that I might suspect my son has issues beyond what is ‘typical’ that might be negatively affected by this mentality? Can we not at least review, impartially and carefully, what might happen to SOME children when injected with live viruses, or chemicals. Can we not at least do peer reviews, analyze...

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